Just read this fantastic post from Kuppy.

I absolutely love how he discards all the unpredictable and risky stuff that sometimes passes for desirable asymetry, whereas it’s just unknowable shit that could go either way. Noise.

I do agree with him on Uranium. I’ve seen it in multiple places. France is one example, because I follow the run-up to the presidential election. Both the incumbent (Macron) and the one I see as his strongest opponent (Eric Zemmour) are pro uranium. Read more here.

In a way, investing is a form of practica philosophy. How do you know what is a good idea? I see most people chasing fads, getting either over-excited or over-depressed. Their vision is unstable, too many moving pieces all the time.

This Kuppy dude is a gangster. Simplify. Clarify your filed of vision. When you finally see a target, move on it ferociously.

He also mentions pushing chips across the table when he got the nuts. It reminded me of my poker days, when weak players would make the minimum gains when they were holding aces, because they were either not aggressive enough or they were being too fancy.

I feel like SPUT is an easy target. It’s not going to 100-bag, but what do I care? I don’t see how it could NOT double from here, in under a year. Why would anyone not push as many chips as possible on this hand?

Here’s another gem from Kuppy’s post: “I find it (asymmetry) in those rare situations where a sector has been forgotten and left for dead—where any spark of life will lead to a multi-bagger.”

This is true for sectors and for individual stocks as well. An example:

gud-gp

This is Knight Therapeutics, symbol $GUD.TO. This stock has been left for dead. The shareholder base was tired of waiting. But I think it’ll be a big winner long-term, and I’m slowly building my position.